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20121101
20121130
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with five u.s. airlines including alaska, american, delta, united and u.s. airways, we anticipate the t.s.a. precheck will be in 35 airports by the end of the year with b.w.i., san francisco, and orlando airports all coming online this week. an additional airlines will be coming onboard >> all of this briefing in our c-span networks. we'll take you live to the white house for the briefing with jay carney. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. thanks for being here. i have a brief statement to read at the top which is that today the president was able to continue returning messages of congratulations from his counterparts around the world. each call he thadged his counterpart for their friend -- thanked his counterpart for their friendship and expressed his desire for close cooperation moving ahead. the president spoke with president karzai of afghanistan, the prime minister of italy, the king of joshedian -- jordan, qatar, president putin of russia, and the president of spain. with that i'll take your questions. >> a couple questions about the scandal that many of us are now covering
about where the u.s. didn't -- where the u.s. student -- we never had a conservative actor -- a concerted effort of a ranking system. the report does. it is almost entirely prestige and important. in its judgments as opposed to outcomes. we need to think more about how to deal with this problem. the public university has the system of accountability. but that is not everybody, of course. it's caught some way so we're trying to adjust its. but how to half in place incentives systems to focus on outputs is a big deal. during the brief period of time, i joined with the presidents at columbia and stanford. he understood exactly how distorted that rating system was. but then several days later the people told him how much that issue generated in terms of profits and if he wanted to stay its editor, he better leave it alone. >> here again, the role of the president comes in. he was very disturbed because the u.s. rankings were falling. day asked him to go out and drum up more applicants so the universe would look more selective. he said to them, i'm not going to go to rural areas
there versus the u.s.? caller: i was looking at a place in a number of places in the philippines a friend of mine i'm a veteran and talk to other vets and he has a very nice small apartment right across the street from the beach and it's $150 a month. host: do you get a military pension? caller: no, i don't. i just missed. host: host: we're looking at twitter page. back to our calls in memphis. how is the economy affecting your retirement plans? caller: the economy is affecting my retirement plans. when the -- before the market crashed i had mutual fund and a stock in a couple of different companies. as the economy tanked even more i was one of the people who was without employment. i was able to draw unemployment and so i was able to have that until i received another job which was at a greater pay cut. now at this point trying to go back to school, trying to get my mutual funds back together because i did cash one of them out. my ira is together. i never rolled my 401-k over either. at this point trying to go back to school, trying to live on less money, downgrading all the way, having
and outline the next steps i will take. as background, puerto rico has been a u.s. territory since 1898. the island is home to 3.7 million american citizens who cannot vote for president, are not represented in the senate, and elect a nonvoting member to the house. federal law is supreme in puerto rico but its residents are treated unequally under many federal programs. voters were first asked whether they want puerto rico to remain a territory. over 1.7 million people answered. which is about 75% of registered voters on the island. 54% said they did not want the current status to continue while 46% said they did. voters were then asked to express their preference among the three viable alternatives to the current status. statehood, free association and independence. over 1.3 million people chose an option. 61% voted for statehood. 33% voted for free association. and 5.5% voted for independence. in addition, 472,000 voters did not provide an answer. this marked the first time voters were directly asked whether they want puerto rico to remain a territory. one of the two main political pa
and democratic attorney general. one of our two u.s. senators was an independent, elected twice. an independent missed winning the governorship by 15,000 votes over a million passed in 1973. we were the ticket splitting capital of america. we have cents settled back into partisan voting with the rest of america. this is a very polarized era. having said that, when you have close elections you still have a band of voters who will mix and match on the ballot, either because they want to mix and match or they are simply reacting to the individual candidates. in the case of romney and kaine, i have personally been in situations where straw votes were taken among large groups and you generally find you have 3, 4, 5% of the romney boaters picking tim kane for various reasons. some of these romney voters are more moderate republicans and the like tim kane better than his opponent. are there similar voters for obama and george allen? i am sure there are. i never met one of them. but i will say this -- george allen, despite what happened in 2006, he has won from time to time in running for statewide off
is a distinguished former advisor -- current advisor to many government agencies, u.s. leaders and diplomats, and he is a prolific and best-selling author. let me quote from the top of his web site at the university of maryland where he is the anwar sadat professor of peace. "i have always believed good scholarship can be relevant and cons consequential for public policy. it is possible to affect public policy without being an advocate. to be passionate about peace without losing analytical power. to be moved by what is just while conceding that no one has a monopoly on justice." i think our other scholars and our world affairs council college shares that sentiment. jinan reed is a associate professor of sociology and health at duke university, she's a carnegie scholar and an associate director. she is half libyan, spent much of her childhood in libya, and thanks to the arab spring she has had a touching and moving reunion with her father after many, many years. i owe you great thanks for a zesty presentation two months ago, and of course, we won't go into it, but i also owe you dinner. professor ma
the panel and we'll see you the reception. >> next a look at the changes in the u.s. senate following tuesday elections. then the president obama obama and speaker bainer and then the polling during the 2012 presidential campaign. >> tomorrow president obama will be at arlington national cemetery to participate in the ceremony at the tom of the unknown and a remembrance ceremony. live coverage begins at 11:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> 2013 should be the year we solve our debt reform. i'm proposing we avert the fiscal cliff and 2013 is finally the year our government comes to grips with the problems that are facing us. >> i'm open to compromise and new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenge. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i'm not going to ask students and seniors and middle class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me aren't asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the new elected congress starts in january but the congress has to do work in a lame duck session and they have to work on the federal deficit raising the debt ceil
with the prime minister. he is making the first visit by a u.s. president to cambodia appeared he went straight from the airport to a meeting with the prime minister that officials described as "ten se." emphasizes concerns about cambodia's human rights situation he is here in washington speaking in about half an hour and 40 minutes at the brookings institution. tonight we're calling to have live coverage for you. ted koppel talks about the future of network news. he is interviewed by marvin. they will touch on the network is caused by the digital age. we have it 8:00 eastern. >> the mindset of the world well into the mid-1990s was that wireline access was stepped on polls are buried in the ground. it was the key to understanding competition. the intriguing part of the wireless story is how very he people inside the industry, but that is why this report cannot the way it did. it was not just judge greene who did not understand the potential of wireless. it was the entire industry. what turned out to be the case was the hope that some people had to ecotage have a robustly competitive, fixed line
television provider. >> now, a discussion on the impact of tuesday's election from the u.s. senate. this is about 45 pence. -- this is about 45 minutes. host: ira shapiro is the author of "the last great senate." he is here to talk to was about the issues facing the senate coming up in the next edition of the senate. welcome to the program. guest: is good to be here. host: tell us a bit about the book. the title, the last great senate. what was it about the folks who were in that senate, the class of '62? who were the big guys in that class and what made them part of the last great senate? guest: i said in the book that america had a great senate from the early 1960's through 1980, a group of people who were focused on the national interests and were in the forefront of every issue facing the country. it is the senate of hubert humphrey, howard baker, robert and ted kennedy, robert dole and many others. they were an unusual group and they were triggered, in my estimation, by their war experience, the need for dealing with the cold war, and a progressive impulse that focused on some
the biggest impact in the u.s.? >> one of the most powerful campaigns was the trayvon martin case. a 17-year-old african-american, killed in florida, tragically. two weeks after the incident, there was no media coverage of all. a private injustice. the parents start a petition, and then it goes viral. the importance is not just the individual acts of arresting his killer in prosecuting him, but the public. the result, the awareness of the tragic situation of young african-americans not being treated fairly in the justice system or the "stand your ground" laws, where you can almost impunitively shoot someone. that is some of the really exciting things we see. >> in trayvon martin's case, clearly there was an impact, but they were not waiting. they were in there pretty soon, on the case. what i want to ask you -- do you find a difference in the way that companies -- you have a lot of petitions aimed at companies that do specific things. obviously, some have had more political implications. is there a difference in response between business institutions and political institutions? >> politician
go to the u.s. senate and do exactly what john edwards did, and that will immediately start campaigning to be present. i believe our federal legislators are there to take care of federal business and our state legislatures, to be in our -- federal legislators ought to be down in our state, sending dollars to the state, and not sending them to the federal government to have federal legislators play a large game of twister to get the best position. host: bob cusack? guest: the caller mentioned term limits, and it was something mitt romney embraced, and the republicans on capitol hill have not embraced that, and neither have the democrats. it was talked about in the newt gingrich era, but both republicans and democrats are not fond of term limits. there is an argument against it, and that is when members get here, they promised to term- limit themselves, and when they get here they do not know how to legislate, they do not know where the bathrooms are, and just like anything they get experience and better at it, and they break the term-limit pledge. term limits will be discusse
stronger and better positioned to surpass the u.s. in a critical marketplace of the 21st century global economy. according to the national association of manufacturers, russia imported over $500 billion in goods last year, and of that total only 5% came from u.s. exports. this bill will lift outdated policies and restrict american access to russian markets. as a result studies show u.s. producers can expect to achieve double-digit increases over the next decade in exports of heavy machinery, agricultural machinery, chemicals, and services. this is particularly critical for my home state of illinois where we have fallen behind japan and korea in these export categories. most importantly, granting russia permanent normal trade relations gives the u.s. a level playing field on which we can compete from a position of strength in thames of intellectual property and agricultural exports. it will provide a reliable forum for trade dispute resolution. and i would urge my colleagues to vote for the rule and the bill to grow american exports and create good jobs here in the united states by suppo
need to rethink this and it is hard to amend the u.s. constitution and the electoral college is in the u.s. constitution but there may be some things that can be done short of amending the constitution that can change that. we may have that result again. we have had it in the past. it will be interesting to see what the public reaction would be if you have a split decision here. that does not have to happen but it could. >> maybe you can give us your prediction as to the winner of the popular vote and by how much and then some of the key states. it can also mention colorado and wisconsin. where are the state going to go? >> i think if obama gets 310 electoral votes, it will not be that close in the electoral college. he does when ohio and he wins wisconsin. i do not know about virginia, colorado. i was in colorado this weekend, i have grandchildren in colorado. virginia is very close in the presidential race. i think obama wynns enough so he could crack 300 electoral votes. >> for jenna is close. one thing you got to remember last time is there was a huge margin for obama. ev
. measures of the condition of u.s. financial markets and institutions suggest gradual but significant progress achieved since the crisis. for example, credit spreads on corporate bonds and syndicated loans have narrowed considerably, and equity prices have recovered most of their losses. in addition, indicators of market stress and illiquidity, such as short-term funding markets, have generally returned to levels near the scene before the crisis. one gauge of the overall improvement of financial markets is the national financial conditions index, maintained by the fed reserve bank of chicago. this index shows that financial conditions viewed as a whole are now about as accommodative as they were in the spring of 2007. in spite of this brought improvement, the harm inflicted by the financial crisis has yet to be fully repaired important segments of the financial sector. one example is the continued weakness of some categories of bank lending. banks' capital positions and overall asset quality have improved substantially over the past several years, and overtime the balance sheet improv
after that, the weekend after -- of november 13. u.s. employers have added 170 -- 171,000 jobs in october according to the labor department. hiring was stronger over the previous two months than first thought. the unemployment rate inched up from 7.8% to 7.9%. the economy added an average of 173,000 jobs per month since july. mitt romney issued a statement that said the unemployment rate is a sad reminder the economy is a virtual standstill for the jobless rate is higher than it was when president obama took office. we will hilton -- we will hear more about the unemployment number from both campaigns today. they are on the campaign trail with four days to go into the elections. president obama has three stops in ohio. coming up in about 15 minutes here on c-span, we will take you to the first stop of the day in hilltard outside columbus. the first lady michelle obama is campaigning in virginia today. at 5:30 eastern, we will take you to petersburg where she will be speaking with supporters. tonight on c-span, mitt romney and paul brian will be joined by their wives for a rally
. the u.s. chamber of commerce won only one race. even with all that money, it did not affect the races. they were prepared. they had their own super pacs and outside groups. they were able to win those races. >> i am going to turn it over to jim, who served in the reagan ministration and the push to administration. he is also a regular on fox news. what do you think happened last night and what does it mean for america? >> thank you and i apologize for being late. i was late for reasons i will get into in a moment. i worked in a political affairs office way back in the stone age so i can never resist crunching the numbers. there are two ways of interpreting, if you will, how mitt romney did versus president obama. on the one hand, it is extremely hard to defeat an elected incumbent president. since 1900, at 10 of 14 elected incumbent presidents were reelected. now it is 11 out of 15. it is a daunting challenge. the white house tends to turn over when there is an open seat, as it were. only once since 1986 has a president and a party lost the white house after only four years. that was
this in the u.s.. it will take working together with policy makers, with academics, with folks in the technology in st. -- technology industry. there are some wonderful things that can happen going forward if we fill the gap in this country. i ask you on your way out to pick up "education, jobs and the american dream. " we went coast-to-coast and did interviews with ceo's and it gives you a good idea what they're feeling. how the will power their own growth going forward. and maybe some sense into why they need to get talent outside of the u.s. i hope you enjoy the session today with ron brownstein. and i think you again for allowing us to participate. i turn this over to you. thanks. [applause] >> the oakhollow group has been a terrific partner with us -- the apollo group has been a terrific partner with us. i would welcome our panelists on stage and you'll get the really good sense for the two panels that we have a will be looking at by the numbers, the 2012 recap. immediately after, we will have a second conversation on the economy and the election. serving as moderator is ronald brownstein,
of the national senatorial committee made a statement this morning regarding last night. u.s. senator john cornyn tonight made the following statement. here is the "new york times" and how they played last night's election. here is the, "wall street journal." the "washington times." andy "washington post" -- and the "washington post." cynthia on the democrat's line, good morning. caller: my view is how to do with the racism. there is a much divisiveness in terms of the racism. in order for both parties to move ahead, i think that's something needs to be done there. there is racism, and the other topic was how women were huge, especially by the republicans. women are people prepared -- our people. god gave us all the power to think on our own and there is nowhere that he says women cannot make choices. and men, especially on the republican side, are going to have to realize that women should be able to say what we allow with our bodies and not allow. host: can you give us an example of what you mean by racism in yesterday's election? caller: racism in terms of black and white, hispanic -- host: yo
on the u.s. consulate in libya. you'll hear about the fiscal cliff from independent senator bernie sanders of vermont, a member of the budget committee. also jenniferle to behr of thetizer family --le to -- jennifer tolbert of the family foundation will talk about health insurance exchanges. live tomorrow morning, a confirmation hearing for president obama's nominee to lead the war in afghanistan. general joseph dunford is currently the marine corps commandant he would replace outgoing general john allen. john allen's nomination to nato son hold while the pentagon investigates misconduct allegations regarding a c.i.a. investigation that led to the removal of general david petraeus. that is at 9:30 a.m. eastern and we'll have it live on c-span3. >> he was vice president for 82 days. being truman, he presided over the senate. nowadays the vice president doesn't bother with that unless his vote is need. he said that's my job. truman never learned anything from f.d.r. or his staff. it was a transition with zero knowledge that doesn't happen anymore. got a phone call, from the white house, get
electoral votes they get. guest: california has 53 u.s. house members. you have 435 members of the house, 100 members of the senate. that gets you to 535. the way you get to five and a 38 come under the 23rd amendment, the district of columbia is automatically granted electoral votes. caller: in past years, especially with what happened with george bush and al gore and how that went back and forth, are they planning to make changes to this extensive monitoring? and why change from the traditional view of the electoral college to a more back-and-forth thing? i have seen this whole election thing go for 17 months and i have to say that i used to be democrat and i have been so disgusted. when i went to register to vote, i voted republican. i have a lot of concerns and reservations because i have seen a lot of things change in how things operate and how politicians operate. and i am just very, very concerned. that is why, this morning, i got up bright and early to go vote. guest: the electoral college has not rallied the masses so much in recent issues that deals with the political process.
in washington, awaiting the start electionl call's impact conference. we will have this live for u.s. and as it gets under way here on c-span. in the meantime, the christian science monitor is hosting what they are calling the monitor breakfast, and senator charles schumer of new york, the vice chair of the democratic conference and also the chair of the summer credit policy and communications center, is there this morning providing an update on recovery efforts in new york and those affected by hurricane sandy, offering thoughts also on tax reform as part of the upcoming battle over the fiscal cliff, talking about the legislative outlook for the balance of 2012. senator schumer says he expects additional funding will be needed for fema responds to sandy, and he also says social security should not be part of the grand bargain, and it can be considered on the side. we are recording this conference with the "christian science monitor" and we will have senator schumer's remarks for you a little bit later in the day. again, waiting for the start of this post-election analysis hosted by
, demanding that they be more open, more responsive, more effective, or else. here in the u.s. to have the tea party hammering big governments. you had occupied due to the jolly bankers of wall street. social movements are competing. we have to help the more of my mental and the day. we are 3.2 million people at last count. we are asking the world to pay attention to the least among us. there are many things we can do to help them. we will see things are happening in the developing world. think about this particular moment. not just facebook in the heat of the square but the peaceful march across the world mobile phone. across the parched land of the dense rain forests of the congo. technology is transforming things. everything is speeding up. everything is opening up. if i can talk about something i actually know about for a moment, this reminds me of the arrival of punk rock in the mid- 70's. the clash was the very base of the rock-and-roll pyramid. overnight they gave the finger to be dreadful business that was at the top of the pyramid. it was called progressive rock. epix song, know the l
will result in additional tax revenue into the u.s. treasury. again, it comes down to whether you buy into that theory. the republicans hold that theory and belief in it. the other side of the aisle does not believe in the theory to the extent the republicans do. do you have still made over the ideologies -- do you have a stalemate over the ideologies? those ideologies are going to clash. it could result in gridlock and nothing happened to the debt limit comment. i think it will take us going over the cliff for policy makers and or the american people saying, what the heck is going on? we saw a status quo election. the same players are around the table. they still elected the same officials. something drastic has to push that change. i believe it will be going over the fiscal cliff. nothing really happened after august of last year. that's a weird way of saying that. if we go over the cliff, i do see the markets being adversely impacted. if you have taxes in the mix, that will not sit well with others. i do see some gridlock and revenues on the table in the theory of reducing tax rate
and three u.s. territories are on the ground. 90% of those are volunteers. last night about 7600 people stayed in more than 110 shelters. to date, we have served more than 3.3 million meals. in fact, provided more than 29,000 health services and mental health, emotional support, and handed out 125,000 relief items. we are mobilizing a large relief effort this weekend, providing comfort kits and other import materials to those who will need them in the coming days. you have a lot of questions, so that i will turn it back over to it had 34 questions. thank you. >> thank you. we will be taking questions from reporters. i ask that you ask one question so we can get to as many as possible today. with that, operator, can we have our first question please? >> if you want to ask a and pleas deess * 1 yearning. one moment. -- and please state your name. what mom. the first question comes from jeffs. >> want to ask about temporary housing. i know out on staten island today have no hotels or motels. where are you putting those people? are they going to another state or other boroghs in new york? >
of the book "do not ask what good we do inside the u.s. house of representatives." his conversation is about 45 minutes. >> i am the ceo of the texas tribune. i am pleased to be here with my old buddy, an author whose latest book is "do not ask what could we do inside the house of representatives." he is a familiar face around these parts. up here together again is like dean martin and jerry lewis again. he is a conservative writer to the new times magazine and national geographic. he is a native of houston and attended the university of texas at austin. please join me in welcoming robert draper. >> nice to see. are we better off than me were two years ago? >> i really have to answer that question. unit ofk that the measurement that the democrats would use for congress is different from that which the republicans would use. speaker john boehner has said the past we passed a record low number of bills speaks well of this congress. we are not increasing taxes. the way that most people look at it attested to by its record low popularity is that this is a congress that has been defined by dysfun
in the u.s. senate across the country yesterday. how was it that in these very republican states -- montana, north dakota, indiana -- with big votes for romney, they were speeding tickets and voting for what was probably described as -- splitting tickets and a voting for what was probably described as moderate? we have a diverse party. now in the statewide races -- the same kinds of issues exist when you deal with the house. but on the democratic side, it has been driving towards ideological diversity. the opposite is true on the republican side. >> we got to finish -- it was striking yesterday that all the candidates succeeded in getting crossover support, missouri, indiana, montana, and if you look at the states that obama won -- virginia, ohio, connecticut, wisconsin -- there was 90-plus correlation of the vote in those cases di. >> but the blue dog democrats and the house are gone, and this house democratic caucus is going to be far more liberal than the last caucus. >> as our colleague david wasserman was the first to point out, this will be the first time in history that the majority
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26